Friday, July 14, 2017

This 'N That, Friday Edition



Some people are astonishingly stupid.  Granted, all of us are stupid in our own ways, owing to our inclinations.  You are, and so am I.  We euphemistically refer to our stupidity as a blind-spot when in simplest terms it is mere stupidity.  It's like being dysfunctional.  Everyone is dysfunctional to some extent.  So are families.  Some are just more dysfunctional than others.

But sometimes stupidity is ... well ... astonishing, so far out of the norm that it makes the rest of us feel not stupid.  Take this person's bad moment, for example:

Note:  You are expecting a video of some criminal who calls the cops because his marijuana stash was stolen or because an accomplice ran off with the money he robbed from the bank ... or perhaps something along the lines of these head-scratchers.  But you'll be wrong.  I was thinking of this person:




And then there's stupid that can't be fixed, short of a lobotomy:





Long story short, you're not as stupid as you think.  Be grateful.


*****

Speaking of lawyers, this heart-warming story is making the rounds:

One afternoon a lawyer was riding in his limousine when he saw two men along the roadside eating grass.  Disturbed, he ordered his driver to stop and he got out to investigate. He asked one man, "Why are you eating grass ?" 
"We don't have any money for food," the poor man replied.  "We have to eat grass." 
"Well, then, you can come with me to my house and I'll feed you." 
"But sir, I have a wife and two children with me.  They are over there eating grass under that tree." 
"Bring them along," the lawyer replied. 
Turning to the second poor man, he stated, 
"You may come with us, also." 
The other man, in a pitiful voice, said, "But sir, I also have a wife and six children with me!" 
"Bring them as well," the lawyer answered. 
They all entered the car, which was no easy task, even for a car as large as the limousine. 
Once under way, one of the poor fellows turned to the lawyer and said, "Sir, you are too kind. Thank you for taking all of us with you." 
The lawyer replied, "Glad to do it. You'll really love my place. The grass is almost a foot high."
h/t: Mr. Ed

*****


Let's jump tracks and end on a high note.  Watch this video of a dog too traumatized to be saved, until someone saves him with love and attention.  Yes, the formula really can work:







Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Stream of Consciousness on the Fourth of July

I like what I've seen of Niall Fersugon over the years.  His bona fides are listed in the citation below. He knows how to call stupid people stupid in delicate terms, or else call them out up front when needed. Nonetheless, the Guardian quotes him as saying Trump may prove to be "a success in spite of himself." I won't say Ferguson is quoted in context, because I don't know.  But here's the Guardian's version:

But politics, after all, is often a battle of perceptions. Niall Ferguson, a British historian and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution in Stanford, California, said in May: “I think one of the things Guardian readers, and their counterparts on the American coasts, don’t want to think about is the possibility that despite his obvious ineptitude, Trump might actually be successful...
It doesn’t take an awful lot for a president to start looking good. If the expectations start really low, which they have done, ... I definitely don’t rule out a kind of ‘success in spite of himself’ scenario.

How laughable.  Trump's ineptitude?  Success in spite of himself?  Seriously?

I swear, the anti-Trump folks still don't get it.  It's not "in spite of" but "because of" himself that he keeps winning.  Trump knows exactly what he is doing.  Has anyone even noticed his accomplishments these past six months?  Trump understands the dysfunction of Washington politics.  He's known it for a long time.  Just go back and look at what he told Oprah in the 1980s.  He didn't invent his political platform in 2016. He's been preaching it for decades.  And he's been right for decades.  Only, he didn't run for President until 2015.  I think he was waiting for tweets to be invented.

Have a look-see, circa 1988:



I have no research at hand, but I believe most Trump voters didn't care whether he ran as a Democrat or a Republican.  They would have voted for him either way.  What resonated was his message.  In their view, he is not a political bobble-head. He seems to believe his message.  More importantly, he has a track record for getting things done in grand style and with a flourish. He's the boss -- and a good one -- first and foremost. Did I mention that he finally decided to run for President ... and won?

Trump has faced adversity but has never allowed himself to be beaten into submission. Like Phoenix, he rises time and again.  Defeat is anathema to him. What's not to like about that?  Especially if you've been beaten down yourself.  Trump branded himself as a winner, someone who thinks big and attempts big things, a person who believes in himself and is driven to succeed. I have a brother who is much the same way.  Trump shows up for work every day and manages the smallest details.  Yet he knows how to delegate responsibility and let others do what they do best.  He praises good work and chastises slackers.  He creates an international business enterprise and produces monuments of sterling quality.  That he also knows how to succeed on television is amazing. The guy truly is remarkable.  Does he know how to brand himself, or what? Oprah could have the same effect on American politics if only she understood Main Street the way Trump does, but she doesn't, not by a long shot.  But she does understand her audience. Trump does, too.  It is another forte of his.  Hence, tweets.

Contrast that with Barack Obama, a well-read man and glib speaker who never built anything, never hired or fired employees, understood almost nothing about Main Street or working for a living, and had no concept of what a P&L looks like, much less all those numbers on the page.  If he was caught off-guard in an unscripted moment, sans teleprompter, his cadence slowed and he inserted the word "uh" every three syllables or so, like an insecure person groping blindly for the correct or acceptable thought.




I don't sell Barack Obama short.  He was good at what he did.  Ultimately, he proved to be an exceptional defensive fighter.  He knew how to duck jabs and avoid the sneaky right hook.  He knew when to smile after getting hit, and how to grin at the crowd so as not to appear hurt.  Let's face it, the guy knew how to survive a fight without getting knocked out.  Only problem is, he had no offense.  He threw punches the same way he throws a baseball and rides a bike -- like a sissy.  It's a kinship issue he shares with most of his fawning media, all like-minded souls.  Not that I'm being snarky or whatnot.

Having said this, I'll also add that Obama apparently is a likable guy behind the scenes. Most people who know him enjoy his company, or so I have read, and also his insight and wit.  I can respect that.  He seems to be a smart guy, academically and politically. I have a few well-educated friends whose company I thoroughly enjoy.  They make me a smarter person just for being around them.  Obama strikes me as that kind of man. Only, such people should never try to lead a country.  They aren't fit for the job, same as me, unless there's an opening in North Korea. They lack the requisite skills to guide a nation.  They are not leaders by nature and have no instinct for battle or compromise.
They are, quite simply, friends who know a thing or two about certain topics of interest, same as Obama, only they're not as shrewd as him.

That being said, if Obama decides to stump for Democrats in 2018, he is well-advised to steer clear of Trump.  Otherwise, there will be more than one tweet about "losers" and "sissies" coming his way.  Trump is a natural-born leader.  And a fighter.  He knows his way inside the ring.  His punches rarely miss.  And he has little respect for pretenders. He reminds me of Roberto Duran back in the day.  Strictly business.



Speaking of the Obama administration, isn't it nice to know that Amateur Hour has finally come and gone?  The political slick-willies, tenderfoot PR personnel, academic ideologues, cynical intelligence officials, and their Chicago hacks are finally in the rear-view mirror.  Goodbye and good riddance.  America paid a lot of debts the last eight years. Most of them were questionable to begin with.  Anyway, the debts are paid.  La Raza, BLM and Antifa are now fading from the ledger sheet.  They are ending the way they began, bankrupt and worthless.

Tomorrow never felt better.

Saturday, July 1, 2017

Proof That Donald Trump Must Go

Finally, there's proof that Donald Trump must be deposed and exiled.  I didn't believe it at first, but after seeing this, I no longer have doubts.

If you love people and care about the world, this is a MUST WATCH video from Scott Adams.  He understands the danger we all face:

https://www.pscp.tv/w/1ZkJzyXQXgoGv

If the link doesn't work, then cut and paste the url.  Your effort will save lives.

Our political leaders understand this problem all too well.  They, too, see the danger in Trump's tweets, and they understand the implications.  Let me explain:



Friday, June 30, 2017

This 'N That, Friday Edition

Some terms you might find useful:

Tuits:


Related image










I boxed up 293 tuits and mailed them to Washington yesterday, one for each Republican in Congress.  The box was labeled "Trump's Agenda."  The enclosed card read, "Hurry up and get a round tuit."  I'm still waiting.


*****

Fox Hat:

Back in 2016, when the NYTimes revealed that Hillary Clinton operated a private email server through Platte River Network in Denver, Colorado, many people responded with unsolicited advice about clothing accessories made from animal fur.  I found their response nonsensical.  Plus, the reference to animal fur was sure to offend PETA.

I got the same clothing advice upon mention of Obama's post-presidential retreat to an island once owned by Marlon Brando in the South Seas ... and again in reference to Bill Clinton's flights to a place called "Orgy Island" with Jeff Epstein.  Fox hat, my friends responded, or something to that effect.  It was a head-scratcher.  Why the reference to clothing?  It made no sense ...

... until now:


Meh, geography.

*****

Chicken Coup:

Definition:  an attempt by some members of Congress to drive Trump out of office without admitting their complicity in the effort, an act undertaken mostly by those Republicans whose only means of getting re-elected is the pay-for-play system of modern politics, which Trump opposes, all the while masquerading as his friends and allies.

Democrats, of course, are more obvious in their efforts.  So are their media acolytes.

Trump's response:  Tweets and results.

Prediction:  Trump, again and again.

*****

Esses and Aahs

When confronted by certain words that appear to be misspelled, brush up on proper pronunciation before sounding them out phonetically.  Nouns, particularly. Ignore, for instance, Obama's reference to the Marine Corps as the Marine Corpse, whether he meant it or not.  Pronounce corps as core and coup as coo.  Also, remember that Arkansas is pronounced Arkansah and Des Moines as Deh Moyne.  Weird, I know.  It's a French thing.


*****

Doppelganger:

I know what you're thinking but, no, that's not what it means.  You have a dirty mind.

Doppelganger is a German term that refers to a look-alike or otherwise ghostly visage of you.  An artificial twin, basically.

Walt Disney World is creating an animatronic replica of Trump for display in its Hall of Presidents. You know, one of those automated figures that looks and talks like the original.  The mechanical figure can be referred to as a doppelganger ... much as the word witch comes to mind when you think of Hillary on a broom.  As I mentioned last Friday, words such as doppelganger make the user sound smart, which is why I use it.

So anyway, back to my point.  When Disney creates Trump's doppelganger, what words should come out of his mouth?  I'm thinking ... Why not a recitation of his tweets? Such classics as:
  • I have never seen a thin person drinking Diet Coke.
  • @ariannahuff is unattractive both inside and out.  I fully understand why her former husband left her for a man - he made a good decision.
  • Pervert alert. @RepWeiner is back on twitter. All girls under the age of 18, block him immediately.
  • James Comey better hope there are no "tapes" of our conversations ...

Once you pass the Trump doppelganger, you will get to Obama's doppelganger, who on cue will lift his right arm and announce:
  • You didn't build that.
  • We need to redistribute your wealth.
  • You can keep your health plan ... and your doctor.
  • Your healthcare costs will go down by an average of $2,500.
  • I've been to all 53 states.
  • There's not a smidgen of evidence that the IRS did anything wrong.
  • I've drawn a red line in Syria.
  • Hillary didn't compromise our national security.
  • I ... uh ... er ... uh ... I ... uh ... uh.  Can someone please re-start my teleprompter?

Thursday, June 22, 2017

This 'N That, Friday Edition

This year's Nobel Prize in the category of political fiction goes to ... drum roll ... the Washington Post. Looks like the WaPo needs to find some different anonymous sources, or at least some evidence than can be verified.  The old sources and claims haven't worked out so well.  Jeff Bezos' penchant for entrepreneurial creativity has taken his staff's journalism to a new level.  You can read about it here.



*****


In regard to the war between the political aisles,  I notice that snarky and mean-spirited comments come from both sides of the aisle.  It's as true for Obama as is now is for Trump.  Many conservatives still despise "Obozo" and his frowning companion "Assquatch," while the progressive side accuses Trump of incest and his wife of turning tricks.  That's just how politics work on the sidelines. Only difference is, Trump folks have a much better sense of humor than their progressive counterparts. Take Ajit Pai for example.  He's the new head of the FCC.  Progressives don't like him, and they're not afraid to say so. Watch how he handles such criticism:



That's not to say all Trump supporters can laugh at their critics.  Some can't.  They take the criticism seriously, and it makes them feel guilty.  Like this steel-worker from Pennsylvania:





*****


In case you don't keep up with the news, there was an election this past Tuesday in Georgia's 6th Congressional district.  Here's how it worked out:


Image result for hollywood celebrities handel victory


Pajamas and hot cocoa, anyone?


*****


Speaking of ominous and droopy-eyed signs, it looks like Gen Z is breaking for Trump:

new national survey by My College Options and the Hispanic Heritage Foundation gathered info from a whopping 50,000 "Generation Z" high school students ages 14 to 18 to gauge their political attitudes on the 2016 election. In what will surely be a surprise to the older generations yelling at Gen Z to get off our lawns, the survey found that a majority identify as Republican.
While all these kids will be able to vote in the 2020 election, let's take first-time voters alone to start. The survey found that 46 percent of the 18-year-olds surveyed voted for Trump; just 31 percent went for Hillary Clinton. Sure, 6 percent said they "would choose not to vote in this election," but just 11 percent went third party.
The survey, which began in September 2016 and continued through the election, found that 73 percent of respondents are engaged or "somewhat engaged" in politics. And among the entire group of first-time voters, the economy was the top issue (44 percent), followed by education (39 percent), gun rights (28 percent) and health care (18 percent). Nearly half (47 percent) said they get their news from social media sites or online news sites.

Here's how Bill Mitchell explains it:


h/t: Last Refuge

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Hump Day Haute

Georgia voters went to the ballot box on Tuesday.  The sixth congressional district in the Atlanta area was up for grabs. It was Dem v Rep -- Ossoff v Handel -- to replace congressman Tom Price.  It turned out to be the most expensive Democratic congressional race in history, something to the tune of $30 million pouring in from Democrat organizations nationwide. Jon Ossoff, aka Pajama Boy, was their candidate.  Democrats desperately needed a win.  A symbolic smackdown of Trump was the plan.  Money was not an object, even obscene amounts of campaign money. Democrats wanted to show that Americans disapprove of Trump and all he stands for.  To make their point, they invested an historic sum to convince you Georgians to vote for this mensch:

Image result for pajama boy

Yes, him.  Seriously.  Mr. Smirky Lips with the notched eyebrows and condescending gaze.

Then election day came and weather happened.  Heavy rains fell in the afternoon.  Some feared it would dampen voter turnout.  Democrat precincts got the worst of it.  Who says God lacks a sense of humor?

I'm still laughing my Ossoff at the results.  Handel won easily, 52% to 47%.  Hardest hit was CNN. No victory yet for Democrats in this years special elections.  Georgia was their last great hope.